A Resolution About Storytelling

Questions. So many questions. I’m watching the ending of a show that began seven years ago. It does not seem like it is going to end well. (And, allow me to define my terms – by ‘end well’, I mean all tied up neatly. With a bow. And rainbows. Possibly even unicorns. Or, at the very least, logic.)

Ending a show on a note of “Huh?” doesn’t do a thing for me. Lost is a perfect example. It ended with loose ends sticking all sorts of out. It. Was. Awful. Many of us viewers put in countless hours dissecting the Dharma Initiative and whether they were living in an alternate universe and making predictions about whether Jack and Kate would ever finally be happy together?

But that ending!

Because, huh?

No questions were answered. Lots of new ones were raised.

Here, exactly, is where post-modernity and I part ways. I like a Conclusion Ending. My post-modernist friends tend to like the Possibilities Ending.

And, I’ve started to wonder how all of this translates into how stories are told.

More importantly, I’ve started to consider how they are received.

Storytelling is an art. And, as with all art, how one perceives it is so incredibly subjective. I might think the podcast “Serial” is the best thing since sliced bread. (I don’t, mind you. I tried. It didn’t speak to me of unicorns and rainbows. Not. One. Bit.) You may be a Walking Dead fanatic. (I tried that one too. Nightmares on my street. Still. After just 20 minutes of the first episode. Again, no unicorns. No rainbows. And the bows used weren’t the kind I’m interested in!) I’m more of a Good Wife watcher.

I’m noticing that many of those who tell stories, now, are less interested in imparting a social lesson, because whose ultimate authority? They don’t often end with a moral lesson, because, whose morality? And they seem to integrate fewer timeless truths for fear of offending those for whom The Truth is not true.

You might be wondering what stories, then, are left to tell?

Plenty! There are plenty of stories that are still universally needed. We humans need stories that bind us together and remind us of how we were created to need each other, rely on each other, and encourage each other. We need stories about family, faith, friendship, and love.

Those stories cross all boundaries and build strong bridges.

I choose to be that kind of storyteller.

To that end, I’m setting my sights on telling stories that encourage love, that share faith, that celebrate family, and that facilitate friendship, in 2015. That is my New Year’s resolution.

And, I resolve to tie this one up at the end of the year with a big fat bow. Oh, yes indeedy!

Any resolutions for you, in this new year?  Share! I’ll send you a unicorn if you meet it by year’s end. (In the interest of full disclosure, that unicorn may, indeed, be drawn by Sweetgirl. But, in that case, you may get a rainbow out of the deal, too. Win-win!)

What I Learned in 2014

2014 was a year full of new challenges, grand adventures, goals met, lessons learned, and a whole host of moments where dark chocolate was desperately needed! I’m including my favorite posts from each month. But, I have to tell you – it was not easy to choose which posts to include. In fact, reading through each month sent me running for the tissue box more than a time or four (not to mention the stash of dark chocolate chips I realized I was going to need to keep on hand just to get through the month of June!)

So, grab your favorite cup of something warm (or cold) and join me as I reflect back on 2014.

Lessons_Learned_2014_Missindeedy

In January, I learned that I was one in a million. I also realized how very deeply I love my Dermatologist.

February reminded me that Sweetman is wicked smaht, and that I need to pay better attention during our conversations.

March was the month where I finally pursued a long-held goal of mine to enter the Erma Bombeck Writing Competition. And, although the outcome wasn’t what I’d hoped, it felt good to give it a go.

And, of course, in April, Dentists became dead to me, as we learned of sweetgirl’s boo-boos on her teeth.

May was where I reflected on the BOOM created by the very different Myers-Briggs personalities in my marriage.

June brought a painful lesson in turning the other cheek, from Sweetboy, and reminded us how Autism can have painful ripple effects for a parent – but that it doesn’t win!

July reminded me that Sweetgirl is always watching, and that Autism can sweeten the interaction between siblings – especially when a yoga ball (or two) is involved.

August is when I finally realized where my mission field is. And, OH, how I yearn to work it well!

September was the month where I learned that I can both set a goal and reach it and set a goal and fail! The women’s triathlon was successful. The goal I set afterwards was not. (There is always 2015!)

In October, I proved that I can indeed get along with Commitment, after all. I accepted the Write 31 Days challenge. Because, Grace, I know Him well.

November was full of masks, casts, and WINS! (P.S. If you need me on January 1st or, LORD WILLING, January 12th, I’ll be parked in front of the television, yelling encouraging my beloved BAMA’s football players to RUN THAT BALL!)

And, December, of 2014, taught me to shop a little earlier for the “classics”, as I reflected on the beauty of the lesson in the The Little Drummer Boy.

Such grace laces my days. I was reminded of that on more than a hundred occasions over this past year. I’m encouraged to keep moving toward new goals, maybe even toward an old one, or two, that got dropped along the way.

Hope sparkles on the horizon for 2015.

I’m praying that it does for you, too.

Yes indeedy!

What were some of your favorite lessons learned in 2014? Please, share them! I’m linking up with the lovely Emily Freeman, over at Chatting At the Sky, for her “What We Learned” link up.